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Bike Tires & Tubes

You replace old tires are your car when they've worn out. Well, the same thing applies to your bike tires and tubes. Fortunately, you have numerous options open to you. Of course, you need to make sure they fit correctly. But you can also use the opportunity to upgrade your ride.

Average Lifespan for Bike Tires

Mileage determines the lifespan of bike tires and tubes. Not surprisingly, the more you ride, the more your tires wear. 

Mountain bikes trail tires last from 3,000 to 8,000 miles. Other bike tire types, however, lack that longevity. For example, road bike tires last from 1,000 to 3,000 miles. Touring tires last as far as 4,000 miles. Finally, racing tires enjoy the shortest life span -- generally only 1,000 miles.

When moving to a new set of tires and tubes, you must keep some key points in mind:

  1. Make sure you select the correct tire size
  2. Select the right tire width for your bike
  3. Find the tread pattern that works best for you
  4. Select the proper tube and valve size

Determining When to Change Your Bike Tires

You'll begin to see some apparent signs indicating it's time to consider changing your bike tires and tubes. Here are some of those considerations. And by the way, focus your inspection on the rear bike tire where you need the most traction.

  1. You're getting numerous flat tires because your tread edges are noticeably worn
  2. Your bike no longer handles the way it did
  3. You see uneven wear, flattening, or even rounding of your bike tires
  4. Threading appears, or the tire rubber starts to crack or flake off the sidewalls
  5. The siping (slits in tires to improve grip on wet roads) starts disappearing
  6. You notice bike tires blemishes like minor cuts or glass slivers
  7. Treadwear indicators begin to disappear


Make Sure You Get the Right Size Bike Tube

Bike tubes sit inside your bike tire to help keep your ride safe and smooth. Although you can purchase tubeless tires, bike tubes remain an essential part of most bicycles, whether you're riding a road or mountain bike.

To find the right inner tube for your bike, you need to find one that fits the diameter and width of your tires. You can find those dimensions on the tire. So when you buy a bike tube, you need to pay attention to which bike tire diameter and width it fits.

For example, if a bike tube says it works with 26 x 1.95-2.125" bike tires, it's designed to fit a 26-inch bike tire with a width between 1.95 and 2.125 inches. However, some road bikes use 700c tires, so you'll need to find the metric equivalent bike tube.

The most common bike tires include 26, 27.5, and 29 inches, or 700c. On the other hand, Bike tubes range from 1 to 3 inches or 19 to 45 millimeters.

Our Bike Shop Carries Top Bike Tire and Tube Brands

Next time you’re in the market for quality bike tires and tubes, stop by our bicycle store in Mt. Kisco. We’ll get you hooked up. And if you ever need assistance changing your own flat, just click here to learn how. If that doesn’t do the trick,  stop by and we’ll be happy to assist. You won’t find a better bike repair shop near you.

We stock bicycle tubes in all sizes and valve lengths. Have a deep dish road wheel? No problem…we stock tubes up to 80mm length, and we stock valve extenders, too. In mountain bicycle tires, we stock several options from Schwalbe and WTB to meet any need.

By the way, a staff favorite for road use is the Strada. It has a textured center tread for excellent grip and a puncture protection belt. Plus, it’s great choice for rough pavement and dirt roads. We even stock them in several widths for all applications. We also suggest pro cycling’s #1 tire, the Vittoria Corsa.  Plus, we can’t overlook the industry’s favorite road tire, the Continental Grand Prix 5000.

Comments from Our Customers

The owners are wonderful and run the best bike shop around. The staff is top notch and always does a great job. Just got a great tune up, and while I made no request about when I could get the bike back, the turn around was super quick so I had it to ride on the 4th of July. Much appreciated! Do yourself a favor and start going to Bicycle World.

Tim Walker